Wednesday, May 29, 2013

45th Avenue Overpass over The New York Connecting Railroad


45th Avenue Overpass over The New York Connecting Railroad
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 29, 2013



Started: May 29, 2013, 11:36:36 AM
Ride Time: 56:35
Distance: 2.75 miles

From Wikipedia:

The New York Connecting Railroad (reporting mark NYCN) or NYCR is a rail line in the borough of Queens in New York City. It links New York City and Long Island by rail directly to the North American mainland. Amtrak, CSX, Canadian Pacific Railway, Providence and Worcester Railroad and New York and Atlantic Railway currently use the line. It runs from the Hell Gate Bridge over the East River to Fresh Pond Junction yard in Glendale. It was completed in 1917. Amtrak uses the northernmost section of the line from Sunnyside Junction (Bowery Bay) in the Woodside section of Queens to the Hell Gate Bridge into the Bronx from which it follows the line north to Boston.

Amtrak owns the line north of Sunnyside Junction, which forms part of the Northeast Corridor. South of this point, CSX is the owner, with the line being the Fremont Secondary.

The line begins at the Hell Gate Bridge over the East River. This is a massive span, a main span of 1,017 feet (310 m) and a total length of over 17,000 feet (3.2 mi; 5.2 km). Continuing south the line is on a high-level elevated viaduct, over Astoria and Interstate 278 (Grand Central Parkway). The line then is on an embankment and Sunnyside Junction, where Amtrak's Northeast Corridor line branches off, is here. The line heads south and parallels Interstate 278 (Brooklyn Queens Expressway) for a distance. This portion of the line was completely rebuilt in 2002. Now in the section of Elmhurst, the NYCR passes under several streets in a cut. An arched concrete viaduct over Queens Boulevard is followed by cuts and overpasses over streets in Maspeth, Queens. After crossing under the Long Island Expressway (Interstate 495) and passing a few cemeteries, the line reaches Fresh Pond Junction. This is the main facility for shipping freight by rail in and out of New York City and Long Island. New York and Atlantic Railway's main offices are here. CSX and CP also interchange freight with New York & Atlantic Railway here.

South of Fresh Pond Junction, the line continues south as Long Island Rail Road's (LIRR) Bay Ridge Branch to the 65th Street Yard.

The line is 3 tracks north of Sunnyside Junction and 1 track south of this point (with 2-track sections in some areas).

CSX and Canadian Pacific serve the line with 1-2 daily round trips, the latter using the Oak Point Link. Providence and Worcester runs service in the summer.

The New York Connecting Railroad was incorporated in 1892, opening in 1917 as a connection between the New Haven's Harlem River and Port Chester Railroad and the Pennsylvania Railroad's Pennsylvania Tunnel and Terminal Railroad to Penn Station and the tunnels under the Hudson River. It was owned half-and-half by the New Haven and Pennsylvania.

The line was dedicated on March 9, 1917 by Samuel Rea and Gustav Lindenthal. A special train took the directors of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad over the line on March 25, 1917, and at that time it was turned over to the New Haven for operation, though the Southern Division (freight-only) was not completed yet. Passenger service began on April 1 of 1917, with the return of the Federal Express and the rerouting of two local trains. The Colonial began using it April 30, resulting in the first accident on the NYCR on August 20, 1917. Through freights to Bay Ridge began January 17, 1918, and the final work was completed August 7, 1918.

Forgotten NY Article on The New York Connecting Railroad

44th Avenue Overpass over The New York Connecting Railroad


44th Avenue Overpass over The New York Connecting Railroad
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 29, 2013

43rd Avenue Overpass over The New York Connecting Railroad


43rd Avenue Overpass over The New York Connecting Railroad
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 29, 2013

Woodside Avenue Overpass over The New York Connecting Railroad


Woodside Avenue Overpass over The New York Connecting Railroad
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 29, 2013

Broadway Overpass over The New York Connecting Railroad


Broadway Overpass over The New York Connecting Railroad
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 29, 2013

Broadway Overpass over the BQE I-278


Broadway Overpass over the BQE I-278
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 29, 2013

Roosevelt Avenue Overpass over the BQE I-278


Roosevelt Avenue Overpass over the BQE I-278
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 29, 2013

41st Avenue Overpass over The New York Connecting Railroad


41st Avenue Overpass over The New York Connecting Railroad
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 29, 2013

41st Avenue Overpass over the BQE I-278


41st Avenue Overpass over the BQE I-278
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 29, 2013

69th Street Overpass over the BQE I-278


69th Street Overpass over the BQE I-278
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 29, 2013

Woodside Avenue Overpass over the BQE I-278


Woodside Avenue Overpass over the BQE I-278
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 29, 2013

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Elton Avenue Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


Elton Avenue Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 22, 2013

Started: May 22, 2013, 11:59:47 AM
Ride Time: 2:12:14
Distance: 7.27 miles



From Railroad.net:

in 1842 Mr. Gouverneur Morris, one of the major entrepreneurs of the 19th century Bronx and a Director of the New York and Harlem Railroad, built a two mile railroad of his own from the New York and Harlem Railroad in the vicinity of 162nd Street (near Melrose) to a point adjacent his holdings on the East River, which he thoughtfully named, "Port Morris".

Eleven years later on August 29, 1853, the New York and Harlem purchased the railroad from Mr. Morris, for $118,000: it was designated as the Port Morris Branch of the Harlem - the first of two branches.

The Port Morris "Branch" was operated as an industrial track. Inbound trains received a "Restricting" on the dwarf signal leading into the Branch at Melrose. Outbound trains departed on verbal permission and the first signal was the dwarf leading onto the Harlem Division.

It was equipped with a third rail and at one time overhead wires for electric locomotives reached down to where the third rail began.

In the 1970's the line was a combination dumping ground and open sewer, hence it's nickname "The Bronx Swamp". It was at or below sea level, so the drainage was almost non-existant. Most of the line runs below ground level.

Port Morris Branch: The so-called Bronx Swamp

East 161st Street Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


East 161st Street Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 22, 2013

Third Avenue Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


Third Avenue Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 22, 2013

Brooke Avenue Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


Brooke Avenue Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 22, 2013

East 157th Street Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


East 157th Street Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 22, 2013

Thurmon Munson Way Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


Thurmon Munson Way Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 22, 2013

Pedestrian Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut) at Rae Street


Pedestrian Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut) at Rae Street
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 22, 2013

Westchester Avenue Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


Westchester Avenue Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson, May 22, 2013

East 150th Street Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


East 150th Street Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 22, 2013

Jackson Avenue Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


Jackson Avenue Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 22, 2013

Concord Avenue. Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


Concord Avenue. Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 22, 2013

Wales Avenue Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


Wales Avenue. Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 22, 2013

Southern Blvd. Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


Southern Blvd. Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 22, 2013

Bruckner Blvd. Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)


Bruckner Blvd. Overpass (over the Port Morris Branch RR cut)
Local 2-wheeler, Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 22, 2013

Pedestrian Overpass over Bruckner Blvd. (at Bryant Avenue)


Pedestrian Overpass over Bruckner Blvd. (at Bryant Avenue)
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman, May 22, 2013

Faile Street overpass Overpass (over Metro North RR)


Faile Street overpass Overpass (over Metro North RR), May 22, 2013
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson

Hunts Point Avenue Overpass (over Metro North RR)


Hunts Point Avenue Overpass (over Metro North RR), May 22, 2013
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson

From forgotten-ny.com The Hunts Point railroad station is a relic of a period when local service was offered on high-speed rail lines in the southern and eastern Bronx, and additionally a relic of the days when grand buildings were constructed even on local stops in areas that were not necessarily in the center city. This station served the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad (Amtrak tracks still run underneath Hunts Point Avenue here). It as designed by Cass Gilbert – the architect of the Woolworth Building – in 1908. This is one of a series of deteriorating rail stations in the Bronx along the old NY, NH & H.

Longwood Avenue Overpass (over Metro North RR)


Longwood Avenue Overpass (over Metro North RR), May 22, 2013
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson

Leggett Avenue overpass (over Metro North RR)


Leggett Avenue overpass (over Metro North RR), May 22, 2013
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson

East 149th Street Overpass (over Metro North RR)


East 149th Street Overpass (over Metro North RR), May 22, 2013
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Hunter College, Skybridge over 68th Street


Hunter College, Skybridge over 68th Street
May 14, 2013, Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman



Special Thanks to:
Leonard Zinnanti, Chief Operating Officer
Charlie Samboy, Assistant to Chief Operating Officer
Louis Mader, Director Public Safety
Lt. Mohamed Linape & Officer Grier

Video by Fernando Eguchi

The Hunter College sky bridges were designed by Ulrich Franzen and engineered by John Shmerykowsky. They were completed in 1984.

Hunter College, Upper Skybridge over Lexington Avenue


Hunter College, Upper Skybridge over Lexington Avenue
May 14, 2013, Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman



Special Thanks to:
Leonard Zinnanti, Chief Operating Officer
Charlie Samboy, Assistant to Chief Operating Officer
Louis Mader, Director Public Safety
Lt. Mohamed Linape & Officer Grier

Video by Fernando Eguchi

Hunter College, Lower Skybridge over Lexington Avenue



Hunter College, Lower Skybridge over Lexington Avenue
May 14, 2013, Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman



Special Thanks to:
Leonard Zinnanti, Chief Operating Officer
Charlie Samboy, Assistant to Chief Operating Officer
Louis Mader, Director Public Safety
Lt. Mohamed Linape & Officer Grier

Video by Fernando Eguchi

Sunday, May 5, 2013

Skybridge at Long Island University Brooklyn Campus (Dekalb Gate)

Skybridge at Long Island University Brooklyn Campus (Dekalb Gate)
May 5, 2013, Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman


Started: May 5, 2013, 11:47:57 AM
Ride Time: 1:14:11
Distance: 5.94 miles

Skybridge at Long Island University Brooklyn Campus (Flatbush Gate)

Skybridge at Long Island University Brooklyn Campus (Flatbush Gate)
May 5, 2013, Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson