Monday, June 20, 2011

Marine Park Nature Walk Bridge


Marine Park Nature Walk Bridge, June 20, 2011
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman


Started: Jun 20, 2011 11:42:22 AM
Ride Time: 2:11:03
Stopped Time: 2:02
Distance: 11.19 miles
Average: 5.12 miles/h
Fastest Speed: 15.59 miles/h
Ascent: 1001 feet
Descent: 928 feet

Flatbush Avenue Overpass over the Belt Parkway


Flatbush Avenue Overpass over the Belt Parkway, June 20, 2011
Keith Nelson, Rob Hickman

Mill Basin Drawbridge


Mill Basin Drawbridge, June 20, 2011
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson

From Wikipedia:
The Mill Basin Bridge is a double leaf trunnion bascule bridge supporting the Belt Parkway over Mill Basin. Each leaf carries six lanes of traffic - three in each direction. There is a sidewalk on each side of the leaf; the eastern or downstream one being part of the Shore Parkway Greenway. Built in the 1940s, the bridge, which cost $1.4 million, is the only drawbridge on the Belt Parkway.

The New York City Department of Transportation reconstructed the Belt Parkway Bridge over Mill Basin in late 2006. The bridge was constructed in 1942 and has outlived its useful service life. Due to the effects of age, weather and increased traffic volume, reconstruction was deemed necessary. The reconstruction work was accomplished in 2 stages.

Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge


Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge over Rockaway Inlet, June 20, 2011
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson



From Wikipedia:
The Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge in New York City (originally Marine Parkway Bridge) is a vertical lift bridge that crosses Rockaway Inlet and connects the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens, with Marine Parkway to Floyd Bennett Field, Flatbush Avenue, and the Marine Park neighborhood in Brooklyn. Opened on July 3, 1937, it carries four motor traffic lanes, and a footpath on the western edge. Cyclepaths along both sides of the Parkway connect to the Shore Parkway Greenway and to Flatbush Avenue. The operation of this bridge includes the maintenance of the Marine Parkway from the toll plaza to Jacob Riis Park. Though a city-owned and operated bridge, it connects two parts of Gateway National Recreation Area, a unit of the National Park System: Floyd Bennett Field and Jacob Riis Park. The bridge is designated as New York State Route 901B, an unsigned reference route.

Since September 15, 2008, the crossing charge for a two-axle passenger vehicle is $2.50, with a $.95 discount for E-ZPass users. The crossing charge for a motorcycle is $2.25 charged in each direction, with a $.96 discount for E-ZPass users. Certain resident discounts apply to this bridge. Since July 12, 2009, the crossing charge for a two-axle passenger vehicle is $2.75, with a $1.04 discount for E-ZPass users. The crossing charge for a motorcycle is $2.50 charged in each direction, with a $1.08 discount for E-ZPass users. Certain resident discounts apply to this bridge. As of December 30, 2010, the crossing charge for a two-axle passenger vehicle is increased to $3.25 (cash), $2.17 (token), and $1.80 ($1.45 discount) for E-ZPass users. The crossing charge for a motorcycle is $2.75 charged in each direction, with a $1.26 discount for E-ZPass users. Certain resident discounts apply to this bridge.

The bridge is owned by the City of New York and operated by the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority, an affiliate agency of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

History:
Built and opened by the Marine Parkway Authority in 1937, it was the longest vertical lift span in the world for automobiles. The curled tops of the towers were designed to give the bridge a whimsical aspect. Following the 1940 merger of the Marine Parkway Authority and Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority, the operation of the bridge fell to TBTA. In 1978, the bridge was renamed for Gil Hodges, the former first baseman for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Hodges kept a residence in Brooklyn after his team moved to Los Angeles. He also played for the New York Mets at the end of his career, and managed the Mets from 1968 until his death in 1972, including victory in the 1969 World Series.

Facts:
The center span is lifted and lowered 100 times a year to allow vessels to pass beneath the roadway.
The center span is 540 feet (160 m) long and is only 55 feet (17 m) above the water but can be lifted up to a height of 150' feet above the water. Part of the crash of American Airlines Flight 587 was filmed from a tollbooth camera on this bridge.
A beautiful view of the Manhattan skyline can be seen from the bridge driving into Brooklyn.

Renovating the Bridge:
In 1999 the following elements of the bridge were renovated:
The existing steel-grated roadway deck on the lift span was replaced with a concrete-and-steel orthotropic deck. A new concrete ("Jersey") barrier now separates opposing traffic flows. The elevators and electrical systems in the towers were replaced. New variable message signs and traffic control devices were installed on the bridge, approach roadways and toll plaza. A new service building was built at the toll plaza.

Belt Parkway Bridge over Gerritsen Inlet


Belt Parkway Bridge over Gerritsen Inlet, June 20, 2011
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson

Bedford Avenue Overpass over the Long Island Rail Road (Bay Ridge Branch)


Bedford Avenue Overpass over the Long Island Rail Road (Bay Ridge Branch), June 20, 2011
Rob Hickman, Keith Nelson